Sickle Cell Anemia and Academic Accommodations

Posted On July 1, 2019
Categories Uncategorized

According to this year’s data report via quick base server, Georgia State’s office of Disability Services provides accommodations to more than 100 students across all campuses who identify has having sickle cell disease. The centers for disease control and prevention defines this disease as a collective of inherited red blood cell disorders which clog blood flow within small blood vessels, ultimately leading to a shortage in the amount of red blood cells dispersed throughout the body (Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 2019). Complications of the disease can range from mild to severe, including shortness of breath, fatigue, organ damage and stroke (Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 2019).

The center for disease control and prevention estimated nearly 100,000 americans are affected by this challenging disease, according to their report published in 2017 (Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 2017). With June 19 being world sickle cell day, it is important to raise awareness, not only about the disease itself, but also about the fact that Georgia State’s office of Disability Services, no matter the campus, is equipped to accommodate students and ensure their academic success. Once registered with Disability Services, students are assigned a service provider who manages their accommodations during their entire academic career at Georgia State. Accommodations for this specific population of students may include, but are not limited to, extra time for test-taking, note-taking services and periodic breaks during class. Students will also have access to academic coaches who provide them with academic support on a weekly basis.

For more information on how to register for services please visit https://disability.gsu.edu/services/how-to-register/

Center for Disease Control and Prevention (2017, August 09). Data & Statistics on Sickle Cell Disease. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/sicklecell/data.html
Center for Disease Control and Prevention (2019, June 11). What is Sickle Cell Disease? Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/sicklecell/facts.html